Groups build oyster reef on James Island shortline to combat water pollution

VIDEO: Groups build oyster reef on James Island shortline to combat water pollution

CHARLESTON, SC (WCSC) - The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, the Charleston Waterkeeper, and dozens of volunteers took water pollution into their own hands Saturday.

The groups tossed hundreds of bags down the line to form a man-made oyster reef on the shoreline of James Island, which borders the Charleston Harbor.

With heavy commercial traffic, the amount of pollution in the Charleston Harbor is no secret. This group wants to change than

“The harbor generally is not a place where you want to eat fish or oysters out of you have a lot of boats in the port so it’s an area of water quality issues so hopefully these help that a bit,” Zach Bjur, a wildlife biologist with SCORE says.

By simply taking a few hours to build a new reef the water has a greater chance of being that much cleaner.

Each oyster can filter 2.5 gallons of water an hour. That may not sound like a lot, but when you do the math, fifty gallons per oyster per day multiplied by the twelve-thousand oysters this reef will eventually have, you then have 600,000 gallons of water filtered per day.

“We want to put some hard work and elbow grease into the estuaries to make a difference,” Bjur says.

Bjur says if they didn’t take time to put in hard work, there could be serious environmental consequences in the future.

“Oysters are really vital in our estuaries and estuary without oysters is one without life,” Bjur says.

The biologists say they are planning several more reef builds this year. If you missed out this time, you still have a chance. You can visit score.dnr.sc.gov to find event information.

Each oyster can filter 2.5 gallons of water an hour. That may not sound like a lot, but when you do the math, fifty gallons per oyster per day multiplied by the twelve-thousand oysters this reef will eventually have, you then have 600,000 gallons of water filtered per day. (Source: Live 5 News)
Each oyster can filter 2.5 gallons of water an hour. That may not sound like a lot, but when you do the math, fifty gallons per oyster per day multiplied by the twelve-thousand oysters this reef will eventually have, you then have 600,000 gallons of water filtered per day. (Source: Live 5 News)

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