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How to master the parent teacher conference - Live5News.com | Charleston, SC | News, Weather, Sports

How to master the parent teacher conference

WILMINGTON, NC (WECT)- From the moment a child enters the classroom, both the teacher and the parent need to work together to give them the best education possible.

Parent- teacher conferences are a great way to help a child improve their grades, stay motivated, and get excited about their future.

While most schools only schedule 1 to 2 days of parent teacher conferences, you can have a meeting with your child's teacher as often as you like.

And kids whose parents get involved have a big advantage over others.

WECT spoke with Valita Quattelbaum, the Chief Communications Officer of New Hanover County schools, to get the best tips on improving your child's education.

After speaking with teachers, guidance counselors, and parents, here is what they suggest.

PARENT TIPS FOR SUCCESSFUL PARENT-TEACHER CONFERENCES

  • Make sure you take a note pad and jot down the answers to your questions.
  • Ask your child if they have any questions for the teacher that you can ask.
  • Share with your child the notes you have taken.
  • Be prompt, be prepared, be positive, be under control emotionally, be respectful, be appreciative, 
  • Stay on topic and do not stay beyond allotted time. 

SOME IMPORTANT QUESTIONS TO ASK

  1. What are the main skills and knowledge that my child will be expected to understand and master to be successful in math, language, science, history….

   2.   Do you have a copy of the standard course of study for this grade level so I can assist   my child at home?

   3. How do you inform my child of the academic expectations and the standards that he/she must master? 

  4.  How will my child be evaluated?  What types of information do you gather to access my child's learning?

  5. How will my child or I know what it means to be successful on an assignment?  Do you use rubrics?

  6. How are grades determined?

  7. What can I do as a parent to stay more involved in my child's academic progress?

  8.  How will I be informed or kept informed of assignments that my child will be expected to do at home?

  9.   How will you accommodate differences in learning?

 10. What will you do as a teacher if my child falls behind or becomes bored because they are fast learners?

 11. As a twenty-first century learner, how will you prepare my child to be successful after high school graduation? 

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