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Local surf club changing lives, one wave at a time. - Live5News.com | Charleston, SC | News, Weather, Sports

Local surf club changing lives, one wave at a time.

Surfing is sometimes described as a sense of euphoria or an out of body experience. For one surf club, it's all about having a good time and doing what you love.

"The great thing about surfing is gravity is pushing you down, the force of the wave is pushing you up, in the middle of that is surfing, it feels a little bit like flying" said Co-founder of The Macho Beach Nose Riders Surf Club Tim Mcmanus.

"It's all about drinking beers, having a good time surfing" Mcmanus said.

The Macho Beach Nose Riders Surf Club was formed in Charleston and started with a group of guys that love traveling and looking for big waves. The club has 40 members, including honorary members Wayne Newton and Eddie Vedder.

For the men and women in the club, surfing is a big part of their lives. They try to go on surf trips at least once a year. The club's wild and crazy passport stamping adventures were recently featured in the may issue of Men's Journal magazine.

"To get into the surf club the whole deal is you have to take a passport stamping adventure with two existing members. So, it's pretty difficult to get in. We're over 40 members so, it shows you how active. We've been traveling over the last few years," Mcmanus said.

The group obviously likes to have fun. Their mascot is a beer can on a surf board. But 10 years ago, on their search for big waves in Costa Rica, not only did they find some of the most amazing waves to surf in the world, but they also discovered they could change lives, one wave at a time.

"One of our good friends who owns a hotel down there, started bringing orphans from San Jose, Costa Rica down to the beach for a one-day surf clinic, and that was 10 years ago," Mcmanus said. "And since that time we've done it every year now there's about 60 to 80 kids that come down every year."

But, it was Mc manus' first trip to Costa Rica, that brought him closer to sharing what it feels like to surf.

"The first year I went down I was working with a kid. I taught him to surf. His name is Jose. He was 8 years old, this year he is 18 and he's coming back. He's no longer at the orphanage and he works as a counselors at the camp," Mcmanus said.

The surf club says they were just doing what they love to do when the magazine took notice.

"We were just kickin' it on the beach drinking some beers and catching some waves, but they thought it was cool so we're in there, and were excited for that," he said. "It's just been this real cool reason to travel, it been a rewarding thing to do at the end of a surf trip, and it's something out of the ordinary but it's not very difficult to do."

You can find more information on the surf club visit their website.

The group also has another important rule, once they plan a surfing trip, you have to go, no excuses.

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