All Lowcountry school districts receive lower grades

CHARLESTON, SC (WCSC) - All Lowcountry school districts got lower scores on their federal report card. The grades range anywhere from "A" to "F."

On Thursday, the South Carolina State Department of Education released federal information rating academic progress of students across the state.

The data showed only eight districts across the state improved by at least a letter grade during the 2012-2013 school year.

While the scores are lower, some Lowcountry school districts are still performing above state standards.

The score comes from information based on results from standardized tests in math, science, social studies, English and high school graduation rates.

Dorchester District 2 maintained an "A" and is the only Lowcountry district to get that grade. Their number score went down from 91.7 to 90.7.

DD2 superintendent Joe Pye said, "The release of our students' academic performance from last year will allow our teachers to plan and individualize instruction to serve every student in their classroom beginning on the first day of school."

Dorchester District 4 dropped from an "A" to a "C." The district is smaller than most with only 6 schools and superintendent, Jerry Montjoy says he is totally disappointed in the score. Montjoy blames it on the low graduation rate of Woodland High School, the only high school in the district.

Montjoy continued to say he expects a higher report card grade when the state scores are released in November.

Berkeley County's score went down from an "A" to a "B." While Charleston and Beaufort Counties both maintained "B" averages. Georgetown got a "C" and Colleton County received a "D." Horry County barely missed an "A" dropping to a "B." Jasper County got an "F," coming in last with the lowest grade in the state.

Visit the website for the South Carolina State Department of Education to look up grades for districts and individual schools.

21 school districts went from an "A" to "F" in one year.

Nearly half of the state's school districts got a lower federal report card grade compared to last year.

There are 85 districts and 39 of them went down at least a full letter grade. Less than half got a "C" or better; while eight districts were given an "F."

The information is based on results from standardized tests in math, science, social studies, English and high school graduation rates.

State superintendent Mick Zais says poorer student achievement isn't to blame, but instead it's the higher performance goals that were set for last school year.

This year the state as a whole got an 83.8 "B."

State report cards will be released in November.