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Judge in 'loud music' trial tells jury to continue deliberating - Live5News.com | Charleston, SC | News, Weather, Sports

Mistrial on murder charge declared in 'loud music' trial

Judge Russell Healey praised the jury in Michael Dunn's trial and gave them instructions to continue deliberations. (Source: CNN) Judge Russell Healey praised the jury in Michael Dunn's trial and gave them instructions to continue deliberations. (Source: CNN)

JACKSONVILLE, FL (RNN) - The jury in the murder trial of Michael Dunn did not reach a verdict on first-degree murder Saturday but found him guilty on four other charges in the shooting of a 17-year-old.

Judge Russell Healey had ordered the jurors to continue deliberating after they initially told him they were hung on count one, first-degree murder.

About two hours later, the jury returned a final verdict that found Dunn guilty of the four other counts - including second-degree murder, two counts of attempted second-degree murder and shooting into an occupied vehicle. He is facing up to 75 years in prison.

A hung jury on first-degree murder means the prosecution can retry Dunn on that count with a new jury. State Attorney Angela Corey confirmed later Saturday night that she would retry Dunn.

Dunn, 47, was charged with shooting and killing teenager Jordan Davis after firing into an SUV outside a convenience store in November 2012. The car was carrying Davis and three others who were unharmed.

The defendant used the controversial "stand your ground" law, which was also at the center of the trial involving George Zimmerman and Trayvon Martin in 2013. Dunn's case has drawn strong comparisons to the Zimmerman trial because Dunn is white and Davis was black. Davis, like Martin, was unarmed when the shooting happened.

Before reaching the first verdict, the jury sent a note to Healey informing him they could not unanimously agree on the first-degree murder charge.

Healey ordered them to continue working to reach a verdict and read instructions to the jury members to assist them in their deliberations.

The jury then sent questions back to the judge. One of their questions was to clarify what would be considered a mistrial.

After Healey clarified that a mistrial would only be declared for the charge on which the jury was hung, he sent the trial into recess.

Copyright 2014 Raycom News Network. All rights reserved.

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