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Caitlyn's chin wound will not require additional surgery, doctor - Live5News.com | Charleston, SC | News, Weather, Sports

Caitlyn's chin wound will not require additional surgery, doctor says

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Source: Charleston Animal Society Source: Charleston Animal Society
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CHARLESTON, SC (WCSC) -

Officials with the Charleston Animal Society were worried a little setback to Caitlyn's recovery would require additional surgery. They were relieved to learn Friday that surgery can be avoided. 

On Thursday, CAS officials said they received word Caitlyn's chin wound opened up and would likely need to be re-sutured by Dr. Henry Bianucci on Friday.

Last week, Bianucci operated on the 15-month-old Staffie mix who had been found muzzled with electrical tape last month in North Charleston.

According to CAS spokesperson Kay Hyman, the doctor decided Friday after taking a look at her wound that surgery would not be necessary. The doctor said although Caitlyn's wound was oozing, there was no blood, and it is healing on its own.

Caitlyn's last surgery took about two hours and repaired the dog's cheek and lips; originally the surgery called for work on Caitlyn's tongue, but doctors said it was not needed since the tongue was in better shape than they thought.

"Her tongue had sloughed a small area of dead tissue," Bianucci said in a statement last week. "The shape was roughly that of a maple leaf. It was really amazing. The combination of [hyperbaric oxygen therapy] and cold laser therapy reduced the tissue loss from the tongue to an absolute minimum."

"Her tongue had sloughed a small area of dead tissue," Bianucci said in a statement last week. "The shape was roughly that of a maple leaf. It was really amazing. The combination of [hyperbaric oxygen therapy] and cold laser therapy reduced the tissue loss from the tongue to an absolute minimum."

SLIDESHOW: Photos from Caitlyn's recovery

Doctors initially estimated loss of up to a third of her tongue, but ultimately less than one-eighth, he said.

Caitlyn's surgeries are being covered by the Charleston Animal Society's Toby's Fund, which goes towards providing medical and behavioral treatment to animals brought in to the shelter

Copyright 2015 WCSC. All rights reserved. 

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