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Georgetown County government returns to normal operating conditi - Live5News.com | Charleston, SC | News, Weather, Sports

Georgetown County government returns to normal operating conditions

Severe thunderstorms are possible in the area Wednesday. (Photo Source: WCSC) Severe thunderstorms are possible in the area Wednesday. (Photo Source: WCSC)
GEORGETOWN COUNTY, SC (WCSC) -

Georgetown County government returned to normal operating conditions, also known as Operating Condition 5, at 4 p.m.

However, Emergency Management Division staff is urging the public to continue practicing caution on roadways due to the continuing threat of high winds and possible severe weather.

"The county’s Emergency Management Division, in conjunction with S.C. Emergency Management and the National Weather Service, will continue to monitor the storm system until it has passed our area completely," Georgetown County officials said. 

The county had been operating on Condition Four (OPCON4) in preparation for the predicted severe weather earlier on Wednesday. 

Georgetown County schools are closed because of the threat. 

According to the news release, the county’s Emergency Management Division, in conjunction with S.C. Emergency Management and the National Weather Service, is monitoring the situation closely.

Motorists are advised to stay off the road if at all possible during this storm. 

The news release adds the following advice:

When driving in strong winds:

  • Anticipate gusts and take special care when driving through areas prone to strong winds, such as over bridges.
  • Be aware of large vehicles on the road such as tractor-trailers and recreational vehicles, as they are more susceptible to high winds and drivers may have difficulties staying in their lanes.
  • Keep both hands on the wheel and keep a firm grip in case the wind begins to move your vehicle.

Residents are also advised to take the following safety precautions:

  • Know the difference between a tornado watch and a tornado warning. A watch is issued when weather conditions are such that tornadoes are likely to develop. A tornado warning is issued when a tornado has been sighted or indicated by radar.
  • Listen to NOAA Weather Radio, commercial radio or television for the latest weather information.
  • Be alert for approaching storms.
  • Be ready to take shelter.

If a tornado warning is issued, you should:

  • Take shelter immediately in a house or small building. If there is no basement, go to an interior room on the lowest level.
  • Get under a sturdy table and cover your head. Stay there until the danger has passed.
  • In a vehicle, trailer or mobile home, get out immediately and go to a more substantial structure. If there is no shelter nearby, lie flat in the nearest ditch and cover your head. Do not attempt to out-drive a tornado.
  • Severe thunderstorms can produce dangerous flash flooding, lightning, hail and strong winds. Listen to your radio or television for the latest severe weather statements. A severe thunderstorm watch will tell you when and where severe thunderstorms are more likely to occur. A severe thunderstorm warning is issued when severe weather has been reported or indicated by radar. Warnings indicate imminent danger to life and property to those in the path of the storm.

When thunderstorms approach:

  • Move to a sturdy building or car.
  • Do not attempt to cross flooded roads in your car.
  • Do not walk through moving water. Six inches of moving water can knock you off your feet.

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