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Hermine leaves marks across the Lowcountry - Live5News.com | Charleston, SC | News, Weather, Sports

Hermine leaves marks across the Lowcountry

A road partially washed away in Murrells Inlet on Highway 17 Business. (Source: Live 5) A road partially washed away in Murrells Inlet on Highway 17 Business. (Source: Live 5)
A gator was spotted on a Goose Creek street as the storm passed through. (Source: Natasha Adams) A gator was spotted on a Goose Creek street as the storm passed through. (Source: Natasha Adams)
A tree fell on a house and half a duplex on Magnolia Road in West Ashley. (Source: Live 5) A tree fell on a house and half a duplex on Magnolia Road in West Ashley. (Source: Live 5)
Residents in Eutawville reporting downed trees and flooding. (Source: Shannon McChesney) Residents in Eutawville reporting downed trees and flooding. (Source: Shannon McChesney)
CHARLESTON, SC (WCSC) -

Tropical Storm Hermine's impact on the Lowcountry was not as widespread as initially feared, but the storm did manage to leave damage in its wake.

In North Charleston, the downpours from Hermine set a new rainfall record of 2.22 inches. The previous 24-hour rainfall record for the area was 1.75 inches set in 2007.

Hermine's winds knocked down trees across the area, including a large gum tree on Magnolia Road in West Ashley. The tree fell on a house and a duplex next door.

Resident Jeanne Nelson, who said she is just days away from her 91st birthday, was watching television in her den when it happened.

"All of a sudden, I just heard this terrible crash like my dishes were falling off the shelf, and it just upset me so and I didn't know what to do," Nelson said. "I came outside to see what happened and it had gone into my bathroom."

She says her home is still livable and will have the damage repaired. She said it was a blessing that she wasn't hurt.

Numerous downed power lines were also blamed on Hermine.

Periods of heavy rain followed by light sprinkles from Tropical Storm Hermine failed to cause massive flooding some feared in downtown Charleston.

Charleston Police were forced to close some downtown streets because of flooding. Choppy waves crashed up onto the Battery Friday afternoon as spectators looked on.

The City of Charleston offered free parking in some garages so residents could get their cars off the street.

With proof of residency, motorists were being allowed to park in the S.C. Aquarium garage on Calhoun Street or the Charleston Visitors Center Garage on Meeting Street. Cars must be moved by noon on Saturday.

The South Carolina Department of Transportation monitored high-level structures in the Charleston area including the Ravenel, Don Holt and Wando Bridges as motorists expressed concerns about the possibility bridges might be closed at the height of wind gusts.

When sustained winds reach speeds of 30 mph, law enforcement will warn operators of high- profile vehicles such as 18-wheelers, box delivery trucks, RVs and travel trailers not to use these bridges. At sustained winds of 40 mph, local law enforcement agencies will notify the public that travel over those bridges is unsafe for travel and not for public use, meaning drivers will use those structures at their own risk.

On Folly Beach, thousands lost power and residents reported downed trees and power lines.

Surfers were assessing the scene as wind gusts caused big waves. Folly Beach officials advised people to stay out of the water because of the danger of life-threatening rip currents.

Tourists ventured out to get a look at the beach but many turned around to go back indoors, saying it was too dangerously windy.

One couple vacationing on Folly Beach said last year they took a cruise when there was a tropical storm watch and a year later, they found themselves right back in a similar situation.

In Goose Creek, Natasha Adams tweeted a photo of an alligator waiting out the storm on Holly Avenue.

A road partially washed away in Murrells Inlet on Highway 17 Business. The roadway in front of Big Dave's Tackle was partially damaged. Officials with SCDOT said aside from the danger to drivers, there is an exposed water line.

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