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WATCH LIVE: Viewers await second eagle's birth on live camera - Live5News.com | Charleston, SC | News, Weather, Sports

WATCH LIVE: Viewers await second eagle's birth on live camera

Source: Dick Pritchett Real Estate Source: Dick Pritchett Real Estate
The first crack or "pip" was spotted Thursday. (Source: Dick Pritchett Real Estate) The first crack or "pip" was spotted Thursday. (Source: Dick Pritchett Real Estate)
By Friday afternoon, one of the eaglets was actively trying to break free of the egg, a process that could take up to 48 hours. (Source: Dick Pritchett Real Estate) By Friday afternoon, one of the eaglets was actively trying to break free of the egg, a process that could take up to 48 hours. (Source: Dick Pritchett Real Estate)
The eaglet E9 made its debut early Saturday morning. (Source: Dick Pritchett Real Estate) The eaglet E9 made its debut early Saturday morning. (Source: Dick Pritchett Real Estate)
FORT MYERS, FL (WCSC) -

A worldwide audience is still watching a live stream of a Florida eagle's nest hoping to see a second egg hatch.

The Southwest Florida Eagle Cam Foundation has a live camera allowing viewers to watch as two eagles named Harriet and M15 have watched over a pair of eggs.

The first crack or "pip" was spotted on Thursday, and the eaglet known as E9, had hatched by early Saturday morning.

The eggs were laid on Nov. 22 and Nov. 25, according to SWFEC Foundation spokesperson Ginnie Pritchett. The eggs have an average incubation period of 35 days, but that time can run as long as 42 days, experts say.

The remaining egg was the first of the two to be laid.

There is some concern about the egg being viable because it was not fully incubated until the second egg was laid. However, the foundation's Facebook page states this is common as eagles will sometimes delay full incubation until all eggs are laid in an attempt to have all eaglets hatch closer to the same time.

Harriet and M15 will continue to nurture their egg until they feel movement and the chick scratches the inside the surface of the egg to break out, Pritchett said.  During the last two to three days before hatching, the parents can hear and feel activity inside the egg and will watch the egg closely.

Once the hatchling has begun to breathe, it will make soft calls that the adults can hear. 

A real estate company that owns the land on which the nest was built installed webcams and has streamed footage since 2012, capturing on camera the birth of several eagle chicks.

Harriet's former mate, an eagle named Ozzie, died in the early fall of 2015 and another male eagle, M15, bonded with her in the late fall of 2015, according to the website.

Watch the live stream of the Eagle Cam here: 

The website's camera has received more than 60 million views from 190 countries since it began broadcasting, Pritchett said.

The SWFEC works with wildlife officials and local biologists to ensure the eagle’s safety and will not interfere or intervene with any natural events in the nest, she said. The stream shows Mother Nature in its true form and some content may not be suitable for all audiences. 

For more information on the SWFEC, visit its website, its Facebook or Twitter accounts.

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