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Boy dies after waiting for emergency transport; ambulance service fined

Along with a $50,000 fine, the ambulance service’s crew will undergo additional training. (Source: KTXL/CNN) Along with a $50,000 fine, the ambulance service’s crew will undergo additional training. (Source: KTXL/CNN)

LODI, CA (KTXL/CNN) – An ambulance service in California was fined $50,000 after it took nearly an hour to transport a 10-year-old boy to the hospital, possibly resulting in his death.

A 10-year-old boy was struck by a motorcycle during a race at the Lodi Cycle Bowl in April, according to the Lodi News-Sentinel.

Investigators say it took 51 minutes to transport the boy to a hospital due to a number of errors on the part of Manteca District Ambulance Services, who had been hired to provide emergency services for the race.

"We found that there were a series of errors that occurred in that event that contributed – we believe, contributed – to the death of the patient,” said Dan Burch, an administrator with Emergency Medical Services.

Burch says the emergency crew mishandled the situation, believing they had to stay at the event instead of transporting the injured child. They called a medical helicopter, but the crew was unable to provide the correct address.

According to investigators, the missteps and waiting led to a delay in treatment, and when the boy was finally transported, it was too late. He was pronounced dead at the UC Davis Medical Center.

Burch says it’s not clear if the boy would be alive today if there weren’t so many mistakes in his treatment, but he says the company should still be held accountable.

"We are taking corrective action both with the communications and with the helicopter service and Manteca Ambulance to ensure that that sort of event is not repeated,” Burch said.

Along with the $50,000 fine, the ambulance services crew will undergo additional training.

The fine is in lieu of a two-day suspension, so residents are not impacted by a lack of ambulance services.

Burch says they’ve never had to fine the company, which has been in business since 1951, for a tragedy like this before. He hopes this will set a new precedent of how to correctly handle emergencies.

Copyright 2017 KTXL via CNN. All rights reserved.

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