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Homemade sandwiches are better for saving the planet

Do you like ready-made sandwiches? They aren't very good for the environment. (Source: Pixabay) Do you like ready-made sandwiches? They aren't very good for the environment. (Source: Pixabay)

(RNN) - When it comes to freshness and value, it's best to make your sandwiches at home. That's also the case when it comes to lowering your carbon footprint. 

A study from the University of Manchester assessed the carbon footprint - or what the sandwich's creation causes in carbon emissions - of various sandwiches.

The most Earth-friendly sandwich, according to the study, is a good ol' plain ham and cheese you make at home, which causes 550 grams of carbon dioxide, New Scientist reported.

The worst offender among ready-made sandwiches is an all-day breakfast sandwich, which generates 1440 grams of carbon dioxide. This figure takes into account packaging, transportation and refrigeration, The Guardian said.

Among the worst ready-made sandwiches for the environment are:

  • Ham and cheese, 1,350 grams of carbon dioxide,
  • Egg and bacon, 1,182 grams of carbon dioxide, and
  • Ham salad, 1,119 grams of carbon dioxide.

The food with the highest carbon emissions is lamb, which causes 39.2 kilograms of carbon emissions per kilo of food, according to a 2011 study by the Environmental Working Group. In comparison, a kilo of lentils cause less than a kilogram of carbon emissions.

A lot of what we do as humans causes carbon emissions.

The average household in the U.S. produces 48.5 tons of carbon emissions, according to the University of Berkeley.

If you are curious about your carbon footprint, the EPA has a carbon footprint calculator.

Copyright 2018 Raycom News Network. All rights reserved.

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