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Fireworks safety tips for July 4th to keep your family from gett - Live5News.com | Charleston, SC | News, Weather, Sports

Fireworks safety tips for July 4th to keep your family from getting hurt

Even sparklers are dangerous to young children because they burn at temperatures of about 2,000 degrees - hot enough to melt some metals. (Source: Pixabay) Even sparklers are dangerous to young children because they burn at temperatures of about 2,000 degrees - hot enough to melt some metals. (Source: Pixabay)

(RNN) - Many Americans celebrate the Fourth of July with fireworks, which can be dangerous and cause serious injury, such as losing a finger.

According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), about 280 people go to the emergency room every day with fireworks-related injuries in the month around the July Fourth holiday.

Hands and fingers were injured more than any other part of the body – with head injuries coming in second. More than 53 percent of injuries from fireworks involved burns.

Most fireworks injuries are preventable. For example, do not drink alcohol when handling fireworks, and, of course, forbid children from playing with or igniting fireworks.

Before having a spectacular backyard display, make sure fireworks are legal in your area before you buy or use them.

The CPSC offers additional safety tips to avoid a trip to the emergency room.

  • Avoid buying fireworks that are packaged in brown paper because this is often a sign that the fireworks were made for professional displays and that could be dangerous for people not trained to use them.
  • Children should always be supervised by an adult. Even sparklers are dangerous to young children because they burn at temperatures of about 2,000 degrees - hot enough to melt some metals.
  • Never place any part of your body directly over any fireworks when lighting a fuse. Immediately back up or move to a safe distance after lighting them.
  • Never try to re-light or pick up fireworks that have not fully ignited.
  • Never point or throw fireworks at another person.
  • Keep a bucket of water or a garden hose handy in case of fire or other mishap.
  • Light fireworks one at a time, then move away quickly.
  • Never carry fireworks in a pocket or shoot them off in metal or glass containers.
  • After fireworks are finished burning, douse them with plenty of water from a bucket or hose before throwing them away. The precaution will help prevent a trash fire.

Don’t forget about your pets. Many of them are scared by our celebrations because of the loud noises. Animal control officials say there's 30 to 60 percent increase in lost pets between July 4-6 each year. Makes sure your pet feels safe and is securely sheltered before celebrating Independence Day.

Texas Tech created a video as a public service announcement on the hazards of fireworks. WARNING: some of the images are graphic and may not be suitable for everyone.

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