FIRST ALERT: Dorian leaves thousands out of power after hurricane skirts coast; breezy conditions continue

Dorian leaves thousands out of power after hurricane skirts coast; breezy conditions continue

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Hurricane Dorian left more than 200,000 Lowcountry customers in the dark after the Category 3 hurricane skirted the South Carolina coast on Thursday, and some breezy conditions are expected to continue into Friday.

By late Thursday night, the outages reported fell to about 170,000, according to electric utilities. Damage from the storm included downed trees and damaged homes and businesses.

Dorian brought tropical storm force winds, heavy rainfall, and storm surge to coastal areas especially through the late morning hours and into the afternoon.

Storm surge was reported in Georgetown County Thursday afternoon where residents captured video of water flowing into one neighborhood. Authorities had begun to shut down streets as debris including trees and power lines fell due to strong winds.

Breezy conditions are expected to continue on Friday with 30 mph wind gusts in portions of the Lowcountry including Charleston, Summerville, Moncks Corner and Georgetown.

“It’s going to stick around for at least a day,” said Live 5 Meteorologist Stephanie Sine."But at least we’re going to wake up to some beautiful sunshine."

Friday’s forecast calls for clear conditions with a 90 degree high.

Currently, Dorian is moving northeast at 10 mph and was about 30 miles south of Cape Fear, North Carolina.

“The outer banks are getting some severe thunderstorm activity in terms of tornadic activity,” Sine said.

Forecasters say the center of Dorian will move near or over the coast of North Carolina tonight and Friday.

“The center should move to the southeast of extreme southeastern New England Friday night and Saturday morning, and approach Nova Scotia later Saturday or Saturday night,” National Hurricane Center officials said late Thursday night.

Dorian, which strengthened to a Category 3 Hurricane late Wednesday night, passed near the Lowcountry coast Thursday morning bringing heavy rainfall and wind with some wind gusts nearing 70 mph.

Live 5 Meteorologist Joey Sovine said downtown Charleston dodged some major coastal flooding as the storm passed the coast.

At 11 p.m., the eye of Hurricane Dorian was located near latitude 33.8 North, longitude 77.4 West.

Dorian is moving toward the northeast near 13 mph (20 km/h), and this general motion is expected to continue with an increase in forward speed through Saturday.

Forecasters say on the forecast track, the center of Dorian will move near or over the coast of North Carolina tonight and Friday.

National Hurricane Center officials say the center should move to the southeast of extreme southeastern New England Friday night and Saturday morning, and approach Nova Scotia later Saturday or Saturday night.

Maximum sustained winds are near 100 mph (155 km/h) with higher gusts. Slow weakening is expected during the next few days.

“However, Dorian is expected to remain a powerful hurricane as the center moves near the coasts of South and North Carolina,” NHC officials said."Dorian is forecast to become a hurricane-force post-tropical cyclone by Saturday night as it approaches Nova Scotia."

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 60 miles (95 km) from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 220 miles (350 km).

A Weatherflow station located Federal Point, North Carolina, recently reported a sustained wind of 61 mph (98 km/h) and a gust to 75 mph (121 km/h).

Dorian leaves thousands out of power after hurricane skirts coast; breezy conditions continue

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