Atlantic tropical wave could become ‘Josephine’

VIDEO: Tropical wave likely to develop into tropical depression within 48 hours

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - A tropical wave in the Atlantic is on the verge of becoming a tropical depression or, possibly, the 10th tropical storm of the season, the National Hurricane Center says.

The National Hurricane Center says thunderstorm activity associated with the system, which is located more than 800 miles west-southwest of the Cabo Verde Islands, has increased and become better organized.

They say there is a 90 percent chance of development into a tropical depression or tropical storm over the next 48 hours.

Early computer models, which plot out through next Tuesday, show a northern turn before the track reaches the southeastern U.S.
Early computer models, which plot out through next Tuesday, show a northern turn before the track reaches the southeastern U.S. (Source: Live 5)

Live 5 Meteorologist Joey Sovine says early computer models, which plot through next Tuesday, show a northern turn before the storm reaches the southeastern U.S.

"Hopefully that will be the case, then it won't have any impacts on anybody," he said. "It's still a long way away from us, so there's plenty of time to watch it and nothing to be worried about."

If it reaches tropical storm strength, it would take the name Josephine. If it does indeed develop into a named storm this week, it would be the seventh storm this hurricane season to set a new record for early development.

The current record for the earliest 10th named storm is held by Jose, which formed on Aug. 22, 2005.

This season, Cristobal, Edouard, Fay, Gonzalo, Hanna and Isaias all set records for early formation.

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