Lowcountry group petitioning to have Harriet Tubman’s image placed on $20 bill.

The Second Founding of America says it wants Washington to fulfill a promise made years ago.

LIVE 5 FIRST ALERT DESK: Petition circulating to put Harriet Tubman on $20 bill

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - There is a renewed effort by a Lowcountry organization to put a different face on a popular piece of U.S. currency.

Retired National Park Ranger Michael Allen will be the guest. He is the chairman of the advisory board for the Beaufort non-profit group, “The Second Founding of America.” The organization is circulating a petition to have Harriett Tubman’s image placed on the $20 bill.

“In April of 2016, the U.S. Treasury Department, with the support of the Obama-Biden Administration, announced that formerly enslaved and abolitionist Harriet Tubman would be placed on a new version of the $20 bill starting in 2020. Unfortunately, the initiative to honor Tubman’s historical legacy and her resolute commitment to freedom came to a halt under the Trump administration,” according to the petition by The Second Founding of America.

The group is circulating the petition to gather enough signatures to fulfill the promise.

“Tubman is one of the most recognized icons in American history and her legacy has inspired countless people from every race and background. Now more than ever, her life story provides a much-needed example of resolute courage in the face of democratic crisis,” according to the petition.

Born into slavery in Maryland, Harriet Tubman fought tirelessly to end the brutally inhumane system and played a profound role in Civil War strategies in the Lowcountry.
Born into slavery in Maryland, Harriet Tubman fought tirelessly to end the brutally inhumane system and played a profound role in Civil War strategies in the Lowcountry. (Source: Smithsonian)

Tubman was born into slavery in Maryland and given the name Araminta Ross. She became known as the “Black Moses,” for risking her life while guiding African Americans to freedom as a conductor on the Underground Railroad after she herself escaped to freedom.

She fought tirelessly to end the brutally inhumane system and played a profound role in Civil War strategies in the Lowcountry.

She served as a nurse and the head of an espionage network for the Union Army during the Civil War, masterminding the Combahee River Raid which freed more than 700 enslaved Africans in 1863. That area is located along Beaufort and Colleton counties.

Allen says it’s time for America to give Tubman the honor she deserves.

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