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Site of one of SC’s most polluted areas could be made into residential development

On Wednesday, the Environmental Protection Agency posted a public notice informing South...
On Wednesday, the Environmental Protection Agency posted a public notice informing South Carolinians they are planning to remove restrictions that bar residential development on the Macalloy Corporation Superfund Site.(Live 5 News)
Published: Jul. 22, 2021 at 4:11 PM EDT
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CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The site of one of South Carolina’s most polluted areas could be developed into a North Charleston neighborhood, apartment complex or some other kind of residential development.

On Wednesday, the Environmental Protection Agency posted a public notice informing South Carolinians they are planning to remove restrictions that bar residential development on the Macalloy Corporation Superfund Site.

The site, located at 1800 Pittsburg Avenue, was officially listed as a Superfund sites in 2000. It was once the site of the Macalloy Corporation, which housed a ferrochromium alloy smelting plant. The plant left behind an environmental disaster with toxic chemicals detected in the land, air and ground water.

“The bulk of that cleanup was finished in 2006,” said Craig Zeller, EPA Remedial Project Manager. “Back in September we took 134 acres off the Superfund list which is called the NPL – the National Priorities List. . . For whatever reason those last six acres are being really stubborn, it still has a little chromium in it.”

The area has since been deemed suitable for industrial use and is home to three different businesses – a paper stock recycler, a liquid sea container business and a container tank cleaning business. However, the land is still mostly empty.

“We were asked by the property owners about the residential use restriction and if it was even necessary,” Zeller said. “We went back and looked at the information. As it turns out, the restriction was overly conservative, and we did not need to put that restriction on there.”

Zeller says the land is perfectly safe for residential use which is why they are opting to remove the restriction. However, there is a public comment period that is open until July 29.

Public comment can be submitted by calling Zeller at (404) 562-8827 or via email at zeller.craig@epa.gov. So far, Zeller says they have received no public comment.

The move would simply free up the land for the option to be rezoned for residential use. North Charleston City Council would still need to approve any zoning changes.

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