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Mooresville High School releases students early after apparent suicide in bathroom

School was released at 9 a.m., and Mooresville Police is at the school investigating
School was released at 9 a.m., and Mooresville Police is at the school investigating.
School was released at 9 a.m., and Mooresville Police is at the school investigating.(Provided by WBTV)
Published: Nov. 10, 2021 at 9:49 AM EST|Updated: Nov. 10, 2021 at 4:57 PM EST
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MOORESVILLE, N.C. (WBTV) - Mooresville High School released students early after an apparent suicide in the bathroom Wednesday morning, the Mooresville Graded School District confirmed to WBTV.

School was released at 9 a.m., and Mooresville Police is at the school investigating.

The district said there is a counseling crisis team on the Magnolia Campus Wednesday for students who need to speak with someone. No other information was provided.

“I was outraged that we’ve lost another child. This is a preventable death,” said Crystal Hobbs.

Hobbs was nearly distraught when she heard the news about a suicide on campus at Mooresville High School. Her son Tristen took his own life at age 15 in June, 2018, when he was a sophomore at the school. She knows what the family, and what the students and staff are facing now.

“I can’t imagine…it’s unfortunate again…my heart just goes but to them because their lives have been changed forever,” Hobbs added. “None of these children will ever be the same, they can’t be kids now. Now they have been opened up and they see the ugly truth of what the worst case scenarios is with a mental health crisis.”

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is a hotline for individuals in crisis or for those looking to help someone else. To speak with a certified listener, call 1-800-273-8255. Crisis Text Line is a texting service for emotional crisis support. To speak with a trained listener, text HELLO to 741741. It is free, available 24/7, and confidential.

“Until we learn how to talk about this, how we can learn t get the treatment and resources out to our communities, we’ve have got to get a handle on this and be more proactive and not reactionary right now,” Hobbs said. “I lost my son almost four years ago to suicide and the questions that I have as his mother, when it’s my job to protect him and I could not save him but other are other Tristens out there like him suffering in silence that need help.”

More resources are available here.

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