‘I was awestruck’: Parents of North Charleston man lose home in Hurricane Ian

A North Charleston man drove down to southwest Florida to help with cleanup efforts after Hurricane Ian made his parent’s mobile home unlivable.
Published: Oct. 12, 2022 at 4:28 PM EDT|Updated: Oct. 12, 2022 at 6:28 PM EDT
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NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - A North Charleston man drove down to southwest Florida to help with cleanup efforts after Hurricane Ian made his parent’s mobile home unlivable.

“You could see it on television, but until you’re there seeing it in person, it’s… I was awestruck,” Edward Boggio said.

Boggio lives in North Charleston, but his parents, who are in their 70s, live in North Fort Myers, Florida. When Hurricane Ian was heading straight towards southwest Florida, he had some concerns about their wellbeing. His mother is on oxygen so he was worried if the power went out, she may not be able to get oxygen supplied for an extended period of time.

When Ian first started slamming the Florida coast, Boggio’s parents, Lucy and Larry, stayed in their mobile home, until they heard the windows crashing around them.

Boggio was able to get in contact with his parents by phone. He told them to go to a shelter. They went right away but had to drive through flooding and debris on the road. Two of the tires on their car went flat on the way there.

When the storm passed and they were able to get back to their home, they found their belongings strewn around their yard. A neighbor’s carport struck the roof of the mobile home, tearing some of it away.

Edward Boggio's family found their belongings strewn around their yard after Hurricane Ian.
Edward Boggio's family found their belongings strewn around their yard after Hurricane Ian. (Edward Boggio)

“It was almost heartbreaking because they worked all these years and retired in Florida,” Boggio said.

The home is unlivable at this time. Boggio’s parents are staying at a hotel for four weeks. But after that, they will have to find somewhere else. They did not have insurance. Boggio started a GoFundMe to help with costs.

Boggio drove down to Florida from North Charleston to assist with the cleanup efforts.

“As I was cleaning up, and just looking at broken photos, family photos, picture frames, and that really hit me emotionally,” Boggio said.

What Boggio is bringing back to the Charleston area is a sense of appreciation for the goodness of humanity during tragedy.

“One thing that really moved me was seeing all the volunteers. All the volunteers not look to their own interests but to the interests of others,” Boggio said.

Boggio said his parents will stay in southwest Florida. He hopes that people will now start to take weather more seriously. When tragedy strikes, he said he hopes you can do what you can to help.