Small Business Saturday sheds light on Lowcountry entrepreneurs

After America’s busiest shopping day of the year, Small Business Saturday aims to focus on shopping local during the holiday season.
Published: Nov. 26, 2022 at 6:14 PM EST|Updated: Nov. 26, 2022 at 11:40 PM EST

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - After America’s busiest shopping day of the year, Small Business Saturday aims to focus on shopping local during the holiday season.

Small Business Saturday is a national movement that began back in 2010 to encourage buying from local businesses.

The Charleston City Market has featured local businesses for decades and Saturday was no different.

Edna’s Lowcountry Owner Jonzetta Taylor started working inside the market when she was only four years old. Her business started over 100 years ago when her grandfather started selling fruits and vegetables.

“The name of our business, Edna’s Lowcountry, is named after my mother, Edna Taylor,” Jonzetta said. “This is just something that we have been doing for many, many years and continue. I’m probably like the fourth or fifth generation doing this.”

She said many things have changed over the years, but the loyalty found in the Lowcountry has not.

Our customers are from all over the world and have supported us in so many ways for 20, 30, 40 years,” Jonzetta said. “We have the same customers coming back and it’s just been a pleasure working here, meeting people. It’s just a special thing to be in the city market, and I wouldn’t change it for anything.”

Tonya Aiken learned how to make sweetgrass baskets when she was a little girl from her family. Her stand has been inside the market since 2008, supplying historic sweetgrass baskets to the Lowcountry.

“It’s changed drastically, of course, which is good,” Aiken said. “I mean, it’s changed for the better. You have a lot of people that actually come to Charleston, for and hear about the sweetgrass baskets to see it and to purchase.”

Aiken said small business Saturday and the tourism in Charleston has helped business.

“There’s been an increase on a lot,” she said. “A lot of people are wanting them because they care about how it’s getting harder for us to get the materials. So when they come and say we have to get a sweetgrass basket. We came to Charleston for a sweet grass basket.”

Both business owners want to remind everyone to shop locally year-round, not just on Small Business Saturday.